Tag Archives: rhyme

Thoughts in rhyme and prose by Robert F. McMeekin

A 2009 photo of LAPD Chief Charlie Beck as he makes his way through rows of officers at the Devonshire Division police station in Northridge in 2009. (Andy Holzman/Staff Photographer, Los Angeles Daily News)

Robert F. McMeekin grew up in Brooklyn, New York and went on to attend Syracuse University and Cal State University, earning his bachelor’s and master’s degrees at Cal State. Now a retired Los Angeles Sergeant of Police, Mr. McMeekin is married with three grown children.

 

THOUGHTS IN RHYME

How proud I am, how proud I be

To be retired from the LAPD

I have fondest memories of the Academy

Most of my classmates still remember me

I learned my craft in a radio car

I thank my partners who took me this far

From a shy wiseass from the streets of Brooklyn

I learned to deal wit crime and sin

The men I worked with thru years of strife

Are now good friends for now and life

There is a terrific bond you do cultivate

From all your partners who shared your fate

For all who read these thoughts in rhyme

I think you’ll agree we had a hell of a thyme

 

 

A NICE WAY TO MEET

I woke up this morning and let my dog out the door

That’s when I saw a pretty lady leave apartment four

“Good morning” sez I, “Hello,” sez she

My dog then trotted over and jumped on her knee

“He thinks you brought him a treat”

“I have no treat, but it’s a nice way to meet”

The next morning I let my dog out at the same time

And there she was—so very pretty—it was a crime

As my dog jumped on her knee, she gave him a treat

“You’re gonna spoil him, now he’ll expect a treat whenever you meet”

“That’s okay,” sez she. “I’ll get even when you take me to dinner.”

“That’s fine with me—I can’t lose, so I’, the winner”

One year later she and my dog were friends for life,

Her and me were also friends but more importantly—man and wife

 

HOW PROUD I WAS

Back in the ’seventies, I was a sergeant of police assigned to Wilshire Division, working the night watch, PMs. One spring night, as a field supervisor, I was cruising along Olympic Boulevard just west of Western Avenue. A radio broadcast came out giving info on a 211 (robbery) that just occurred on Western, not too far away.

The broadcast gave descriptions of two male-black suspects, plus the make of their car and its license number.

As I approached Western Avenue, I turned north, reasoning that it was still early and the suspects would probably head towards Hollywood with their loot.

After about two blocks, I spotted the suspects in their car ahead of me.

I radioed my location with the request for backup, flipped on my overhead red lights and cut the suspects vehicle off at an angle. Using my car as a shield, weapon drawn, I ordered the suspects out of their car one at a time, driver’s side, hands up.

Both suspects complied when they saw me with my shotgun pointing at their heads. At this time, several police units arrived at the scene and took custody of both suspects. Policy dictated that supervisors turn over custody of arrestees to a field unit for arrest booking and reports.

I then continued on my shift as a field supervisor.

At end-of-watch, EOW, I drove to the station, gathered my gear, and headed to the watch commander’s office to go off duty. As I entered the w/c’s office, change of watch was taking place as the morning watch supervisors and w/c relieved the night watch supervisors and w/c.

There were six sergeants, two lieutenants, and several police officers in the office as I entered. Much to my surprise and delight my contemporaries and supervisors soundly applauded me!

I was officially relieved and was the man of the hour. To be truly recognized by my peers and supervisors was the proudest moment of my life.

I never forgot it.